Darkness To Light Translation: la lumière et l'obscurité...

Noirish City....the world of rain soaked streets, dark alleys and dead ends...The Home of Tough Guys, Femme-Fatale, and a cup of (Coffee) murder, gats,...The Maltese Falcon, Val Lewton, Black Angel, Sunset Blvd., dark, light, shadows, Cry of the City, Victor Mature, Robert Mitchum, Richard Widmark, Barbara Stanwyck, Richard Conte, Orson Welles, The Third Man,Touch of Evil, dark figures, Act of Violence, The Big Combo, Out of the Past, Paranoia, dark alleys, rain slick streets, Chiaroscuro......Humphrey Bogart, Mary Astor, Peter Lorre, Sidney Green-street, Elisha Cook and that... "Bird." _____________________________________________________________ To read mini reviews of films that are considered...noirs...You can now follow Tony D'Ambra....on Twitter at... FilmnoirReviews _____________________________________________________________ "The City was dark with something more than night." - Raymond Chandler [Pre Code and Noir dwells here, in the shadows. Beginning next year, movie studios plan to begin phasing out renting 35mm prints of vintage movies to theaters, forcing revival theaters to show them in digital format only. This is not how these classic films were meant to be seen, at the push of a sterile button, in a non film format, and many classic films will also fall by the wayside and become lost films - there is an online petition to hopefully stop this by following the link to Fight For 35MM Films...] Thanks to Julia Marchese, New Beverly Cinema and Dark City.

5.5.12

Taking a look Current Releases On DVDs and Blu-Ray...From Garfield as in John To Ranks' British Film Noir...

[editor's note: [Pictured: The Jewel in the crown for "So Dark The Night"
To read Tony d'Ambra's review Of "So Dark The Night..." just visit him here at Films Noir.net ]
Merci,
DVDs and Blu-Ray Releases Here:
Garfield, Cooper, Invasion Of The Body Snatchers and a Couple Of Ranks' Films and Brighton Rock...
This Week Lobby Cards "Jewels in The Crown..." and a Happy Birthday! Wish To Glenn Ford...and Ty [rone] Power]

TO TAKE A CLOSER AT LOBBY CARDS JUST LOOK JUST FOLLOW THIS LINK TO
In order to Look at the New Cards added To This Month Batch Of Lobby Cards Just Follow The link To:
...and here


IN OTHER NEWS:

Actor Victor [John-Joseph] Mature's film career and life and Times Will be looked at in a book entitled
..."The Films Of Victor Mature..." Which is set to be released in the Fall Of 2012...I think this book is a must-have for any fan Of actor Victor [John-Joseph] Mature.
[What a wonderful name...LOL ]
[Note: You can check-out the book cover here McFarland Publishers: Coming in the Fall..."The Films Of Victor [John-Joseph] Mature" and on my slide-rolls...too! Tks, ]


THE HISTORY Of THE LOBBY CARDS...
[Pictured: The "Jewel in the Crown" the title card from the film "Odd Man Out..." Starring actor James Mason]

In the days before multiplexes, movie theaters generally only had one screen and one movie. To boost ticket sales, studios printed paper advertisements of their films to entice potential audience members.

One of the more collectible forms of these ads was the lobby card, a small piece of card stock that theaters posted in their lobbies to promote a featured film. In a sense, the lobby card was the small relative of the movie poster.

The first lobby cards, introduced around 1910, measured eight by 10 inches and were printed in black and white. Eventually, with advances in heliotype and photogelatin techniques, these cards had three colors (blue, yellow, and pink). Other cards were hand-colored using a stencil.

The eight- by 10-inch cards quickly gave way to 11- by 14-inch cards, which became known as the “standard” size. In the 1920s, a “jumbo” size was introduced which measured 14 by 17 inches. Finally, the “mini” size was introduced in the 1930s as a rebirth of the eight by 10 size (another version was printed on eight- by 14-inch stock).

Jumbo cards were printed on their own, not as part of a series, but mini and standard lobby cards generally came in sets of eight, though sets of nine, 12, and even 16 or more were not uncommon.
The first card in these sets was almost always the title card, which included an attention-grabbing image alongside the film’s title, slogan, and main acting credits. As a notable exception, Paramount never printed title cards.
To Check-Out "Odd Man Out" Lobby Cards Up Close and Personal Just Follow This Link to...
Shadow Street The Best Of British Film Noir

Following the title card [The Jewel in the Crown] were several “scene” cards, which featured still shots from the film. The first two or three scene cards generally promoted the major stars; the two or three after that usually showed minor actors.

[editor's note: What makes the eight lobby cards from the 1947 film "Odd Man Out" unique is the fact, that the title card is in colour and the other 7 cards are in black and white...]


The last card or two in the set are known today as “dead cards,” a phrase coined by movie-art collectors because these cards are generally the least desirable in the set. These cards depict extras or scenery from the film.

All of these cards were numbered in the order they were supposed to appear in the series. Before the 1960s, a card’s identifying number could be found in the corner of the artwork. In the ’60s, the number was moved to the bottom border of the card.

Collectors generally prize lobby cards based on the order they appeared in a set—title cards are considered the most valuable, followed by those with major actors, those with minor actors, and finally the dead cards. Collectors generally only bother with dead cards when they are trying to complete a full set.

[Film Noir and all Of it's gritty "Grittiness..."]


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Miss Ree-ta, film noir, and memorabilia...

[editor's note: Unfortunately, some Of the videos skip to the next video...When this occurs just view the playlist and then tap the screen Of the film that you would like to view. Thanks,]
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